--

--


Anatomy of breathing

 
On your inhale:
Diaphragm goes down pressing against organs, allowing air to come in
Deep Core (transversus abdominus) resists the action of your belly sticking out – as if putting the breaks on slowly
Pelvic floor supports the organs slightly pressing down due to the inhale
(many other muscles are involved in the inhale that are not mentioned here)
 
On your exhale:
Diaphragm contracts and pushes air out
Pelvic Floor and Transversus assists in the exhale
 
When Transversus, pelvic floor and respiratory diaphragm work together in breathing the effect is a relaxed neck, less strain through shoulders and a stabile spine. 


Pilates for Asthma

 
What is your Core? 
By Studio One Staff 

 

The core or Transversus Abdominis is a large deep muscle that acts as a reflex and is not consciously controlled. This muscle supports and stabilizes your spine and internal organs and should optimally fire as a preflex before conscious movement is generated. If the stabilizing abs do not fire on time your spine is not properly supported and you may experience back pain. To reactivate this reflex you can consciously fire muscles in a chain that co-contract with the Transversus Abdominis (TA). This linked group of muscle and fascia starts with the toes and goes up to the inner thighs and pelvic floor where it interdigitates with the TA and goes all the way up through the roof of the mouth. By pressing the toes, squeezing inner thighs and engaging the Kegel muscles you can generate activity in the TA. This is also facilitated with breath and felt most naturally on the exhale. The TA  is working when the lowest area of the abdominals right above the pubic bone sinks with the exhale, this can not be achieved by drawing the abs in consciously. Once this reflex is working on the exhale you can begin to hold the tone through the lowest abs on the inhale. The goal of this program is to have the TA fire with every breath and every time the toes push on the ground. This will ultimately result in a long, supported and protected spine and leaner flatter abs.

 

 

 

Pilates and Balance

Check out this awesome study…other methods work for improving balance but Pilates is safer and lasts longer! 

 

 "...in terms of stability, Pilates mat exercise was safer than exercise on an unstable base of support, and in particular, the Pilates mat exercise program was easier to adjust to each individual’s balance ability.”

 

National Institute of Health: Pilates and Balance    

 

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Pilates and Osteoporosis

 

By Angelique Garnand,

Studio One Instructor/Publications 

 

(Please consult your health care provider before beginning this or any physical fitness program)

What is Osteoporosis and Osteopenia? What’s the difference?

“Osteoporosis is the gradual and silent loss of bone and not a normal aging process. It is defined as a systemic skeletal disease characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue, with a consequent increase in bone fragility and susceptibility to fracture (NOF 2005). Osteopenia is mildly reduced bone mass--a loss of approximately 10%-20%--indicates the onset of osteoporosis.”[1]
The World Health Organization defines osteoporosis as a skeletal disease of low bone mass as well as architectural deterioration which makes the bones susceptible to fracture.[2]

Osteoporosis Statistics
Today, 10 million Americans have osteoporosis, and an additional 34 million have osteopenia, placing them at increased risk for osteoporosis (NOF 2005).

Each year more than 1.5 million Americans suffer an osteoporosis-related fracture (NOF 2005).
One in 2 American women and 1 in 4 American men over age 50 will suffer an osteoporosis-related fracture in her or his lifetime (NOF 2005).
Among hip fracture patients, 1 in every 5 ends up permanently in a nursing home (Salkeld et al. 2000)
People on bed rest lose about 1% of their bone mineral density per week (Smith & Gilligan 1987).[3]
 
Exercise is beneficial for people with Osteoporosis or Osteopenia especially before menopause.

“Though it feels and looks solid, living bone is dynamic tissue that is constantly altered in response to motion and movement. The more your bones are called upon to carry weight, the more your body puts its resources into building them to support that weight. Bone and muscle are part of the same unit, and as you build muscle, you build bone by default. Here’s why: muscles are attached to bones by tendons. When muscles contract, the tendons tug on your bones, stimulating them to grow. The stronger the muscle, the more powerful the stimulation will be on the bone”.[4]

“While both men and women can develop osteoporosis, women are far more likely than men to experience bone loss, and the critical time in their lives for bone health is the menopause transition. For years we’ve been told that women can lose up to one-fifth of their bone mass during the menopause transition.  Waning estrogen doesn’t make it impossible to build bone in perimenopause and menopause, though, women’s bodies maintain bone best when our hormones are balanced”.[5]

 

The VASIE (Van Alstine Structural Integration Exercise) programs at Studio One provide modifications that can benefit people with concerns about their bone density and keep them safe and less likely to fall

 

VASIE methods target TA which helps to stabilize the spine and help to establish a more neutral spinal position. This is a fundamental element of spine health and is critical to those struggling with protecting their bones.

 

VASIE classes teach extension of the spine in a controlled manner that is especially beneficial for those with lower bone density and helps to build bone density of the spine.

VASIE classes are unique in training the muscles of the feet which help prevent falls and create stability from the ground up.

 

While flexion exercise is an integral part of Pilates, the program at Studio One offers modifications for people with concerns about bone density. In our Deep Core Toning classes and Boot Camps, spinal flexion is minimal and is often smaller and safer than doing household chores.

 

“Balance and control play a large role in the Pilates repertoire, regardless of whether you are on the mat or using the machines. Pilates is a whole-body experience and promotes symmetry of the musculature along with proper body mechanics. Along those lines, all exercises emphasize "the core" - the deep stabilizing muscles of the lower back and pelvis, including the deepest layer of abdominals”. [6]

 

The studio one VASIE program is unique in its training and approach to Breath! This in uniquely beneficial to people with bone density concerns.

“Training Costal breathing, in which the ribs expand posterolaterally (bucket-handle–style, encouraging breathing into the lower back) and the transversus abdominis muscles are contracted to prevent abdominal expansion or bulging”[7]. This is a vital component to master before really beginning a bone density building exercise program.

 

Balance is a key component of conditioning to prevent falls and fractures

“For the vast majority of people, osteoporotic bone fractures occur as a result of a fall. Ninety percent of hip fractures are caused by falls, as are at least 50% of vertebral fractures and most wrist and forearm fractures. And falls among people 65 years and older are very common, affecting one in three Americans in this age group. Moreover, approximately 30% of all women and 20% of all men older than 50 will fall each year”.[8]

“There is a growing awareness that simply having weak bones does not necessarily mean fractures are inevitable. Factors that increase the risk of falling (such as poor balance and coordination, muscle weakness, and factors related to lifestyle) have a strong bearing on a person’s risk of fracture. Thus, fall prevention is becoming a cornerstone of fracture prevention efforts”[9]

 

Some flexion exercises are a potential risk for people with bone density issues.

“The importance of these results cannot be overstated. Sinaki & Mikkelson found that 89% of the people who performed only flexion exercises suffered additional fractures during the study. This indicates that it is harmful and dangerous to allow clients to perform flexion exercises when they have known osteoporosis! Many subsequent research papers have affirmed this (Keller 2003; Meeks 2004; Bassey 2001). Forward flexion causes excessive compression force on the anterior (or front) surface of the vertebral bodies, where most of the trabecular bone is located. In those with low bone density of the spine, the weakened bone cannot withstand such force and fractures may--or will--occur. Compression forces on the vertebrae are also excessive during side-bending of the thoracic and upper-lumbar spine. Forward flexion, side-bending and-- especially--forward flexion combined with rotation are therefore contraindicated for clients with osteoporosis--and hence for clients with osteopenia”.[10]
“Flexion exercises where you bend your spine significantly forward can increase the risk of vertebral fractures by putting excessive pressure on the vertebral bodies. Such exercises may include crunches where you round your back, touching your toes from a standing position, pulling your knees into your chest and lifting your chin and neck while on your back, or rounding your back over and downward while in a seated position. Extension exercises where you stretch up and flex backwards are generally safe for everyone.”[11]

 

Extension of the spine in Pilates movements is beneficial for spine health and bone density.

“Spinal extension is a different story. The posterior surface of the vertebral bodies contains the pars interarticularis, the pedicals and the lamina, which have a higher composition of cortical bone and are at less risk for fracture. These areas do get compressed as the spine moves into extension, but the movement is much less risky than flexion because of the strength of cortical bone. One research study showed that people with stronger back extensor muscles had higher bone density in their spines (Sinaki et al.1986). Another found that strong back extensors correlated with fewer vertebral fractures and increased bone mineral density (Sinaki et al. 1996 & 2002)”.[12]

Be informed and use caution in your exercise program.

“Not all exercise is beneficial and in fact we certainly do need to be cautious of overloading forces stemming from movements that can indeed lead to an osteoporotic fracture”.[13]

 --------------------------


[1] “Modifying Pilates for Clients With Osteoporosis” Idea Fitness Journal, Staff Writer, As retrieved on 6/6/2012 from: http://www.ideafit.com/idea-fitness-journal
[2]“The Next Step for the Future of Osteoporosis” by Rebekah Rotsteinas, in Bone Health, Pilates April 29, 2014 Pilates instructor Rebekah Rotstein is the founder of Incorporating Movement and is a member of the teacher training faculty at the Kane School of Core Integration in New York City.

                 

 
[3] “Modifying Pilates for Clients With Osteoporosis” Idea Fitness Journal, Staff Writer, As retrieved on 6/6/2012 from: http://www.ideafit.com/idea-fitness-journal
[4] Exercise and lifestyle by Dr. Susan E. Brown, Ph.,  As retrieved from http://www.betterbones.com/healthylifestyle/exercise-bonesandosteoporosis.aspx\

 
[5]  Exercise and lifestyle by Dr. Susan E. Brown, Ph.,  As retrieved from http://www.betterbones.com/healthylifestyle/exercise-bonesandosteoporosis.aspx\

 
[6] Osteoporosis and Pilates, By Rebekah Rotsteinas retrieved from Dr Weil on http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/id/ART02834 , June 1, 2014

 

 
[7] “Modifying Pilates for Clients With Osteoporosis” Idea Fitness Journal, Staff Writer, As retrieved on 6/6/2012 from: http://www.ideafit.com/idea-fitness-journal

 
[8] “Fall prevention for bone fracture prevention”By Dr. Susan E. Brown, PhD as retrieved  June 1, 2014, from http://www.betterbones.com/healthylifestyle/exercise-bonesandosteoporosis.aspx\

 
[9] “Fall prevention for bone fracture prevention”By Dr. Susan E. Brown, PhD as retrieved  June 1, 2014, from http://www.betterbones.com/healthylifestyle/exercise-bonesandosteoporosis.aspx\

 
[10] “Modifying Pilates for Clients With Osteoporosis” Idea Fitness Journal, Staff Writer, As retrieved on 6/6/2012 from: http://www.ideafit.com/idea-fitness-journal

 
[11] “Fall prevention for bone fracture prevention”By Dr. Susan E. Brown, PhD as retrieved  June 1, 2014, from http://www.betterbones.com/healthylifestyle/exercise-bonesandosteoporosis.aspx\
[12] “Modifying Pilates for Clients With Osteoporosis” Idea Fitness Journal, Staff Writer, As retrieved on 6/6/2012 from: http://www.ideafit.com/idea-fitness-journal

 
[13] “The Next Step for the Future of Osteoporosis” by Rebekah Rotsteinas, in Bone Health, Pilates April 29, 2014 Pilates instructor Rebekah Rotstein is the founder of Incorporating Movement and is a member of the teacher training faculty at the Kane School of Core Integration in New York City.

                 

 




THE SCIENCE OF LOSING INCHES AT STUDIO ONE
(tips and ideas at the end of article)

It's typical for studio one client to lose 3-6 inches around the lower, middle and upper abs.  The inches lost are usually NOT due to weight loss.  You get a smaller waist because you learn HOW to engage and tone the DEEPEST layer of abs and reset the resting tone of your core.  How does it work?

 
THE SCIENCE...

Your TRANSVERSUS ABDOMINUS is the ONLY layer of abs that can make your abs flatter and your waist narrower.

Unfortunately, there is no magic exercise or move you can do to train this. Unlike your bicep, your Transversus Abdominus doesn’t move any bones. But it does shrink your waist, support your back and help you breathe properly.

FOR GEEKS: http://dianelee.ca/article-training-deep-core-muscles.php

 
BREATHING IS THE ANSWER

 So how do we train your Transversus during Boot Camp?

Kegels and Breathing! Sounds basic but this very specific training is research-based and proven to relieve back pain and flatten your abs! It is just one of the things that makes Studio One so unique: We take the time to teach you HOW to engage your core.

 
WHAT DOES IT MEAN IF I DON'T LOSE INCHES?


First, don’t take it personally. It usually means we need to give you different cues and hands-on corrections.  Research shows that your Transversus Abdominus will “shut off” when you have/had one or more of the following:

-      Childbirth

-      Abdominal surgery

-      Prolonged back pain

-      Back surgery

-      Whiplash

You may just need a little extra help in the beginning. That is what we are here to do! Talk to your instructor if you have any concerns.

TIPS FROM ANA: 

1. TAKE YOUR TIME: AT THE START OF CLASS AND MAKE SURE YOUR BREATHING AND KEGEL MUSCLES ARE IN SINK

2. YOU CAN'T FORCE IT: DEEP CORE MUSCLES ARE REFLEXIVE AND WORK BEST WHEN YOU ARE ACTIVATING YOUR INNER THIGHS, KEGEL AND EXHALE. DON'T TRY TO BRACE OR TIGHTEN YOUR CORE

3. MOVE AT THE SPEED OF YOUR EXHALE: SLOW DOWN AND PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR BREATHING, IF YOU MOVE FASTER THEN YOUR CORE YOU WILL FEEL IT IN YOUR NECK OR HIP FLEXORS.

see you in class! 

 

 

 

Urinary Incontinence

Finally, incontinence is being talked about in mainstream media, and with alternative treatments. Read about 5 myths about the sudden urge to 'go' 

 {read article}

Pilates for your Yoga

...Pilates not only helped me strengthen my core, it taught me how to consciously tap into the power there to create greater stability and better alignment...

 {read article}

 

THE IMPORTANCE OF A NEUTRAL PELVIS 

by Angelique and Ana (studio staff)


 The term "neutral pelvis" may be unfamiliar but the benefits of having this in our own body are substantial.

Having a neutral pelvis means:

                  Flatter Abs

                  More lifted and toned Glutes

                  Muscular balance

                  Better core function naturally

                  Less pressure on the spine

                  Better curvatures in the spine

                  Less tension and stress in the neck and shoulders

Screen shot 2014-06-06 at 7.49.54 PM 

When your pelvis is in a neutral alignment your pubic bone and hip bones are parallel . Another way to think of this is if you were approaching a wall or flat surface your pubic bone and hip bones would be evenly touching the surface. When your pubic bone is too low you have an anterior tilt, if your pelvis were a bowl of water the bowl is tilted allowing the water to spill over your toes.

 

 

 ANTERIOR PELVIS:                          POSTERIOR PELVIS:                      NEUTRAL PELVIS:

 300Heather_Thamm0602                     298Heather_Thamm0598                    296Heather_Thamm0597

- increased tension on low back

- difficulty breathing into

the lowerlobes of the lungs

- more strain in the hip flexors

- belly will appear distended

    regardless of weight

- locked knees

 

SO...HOW DO YOU GET & KEEP YOUR NEUTRAL PELVIS? 

Well, two wrongs don't make a right. Another words...don't just shift your pelvis in standing. Do the exercises that change your fascial, neuromuscular and bony positions. Do the exercises and make the connections in your body that get you to more neutral organically, naturally without strain! This is the biggest difference between VASIE Pilates and all other modalities.  When doing a VASIE posture prep (pictured below) you will activate the reflexes that get your pelvis more neutral AUTOMATICALLY and without thinking. Every VASIE class is designed to get your pelvis more neutral, it is the foundation for a great, pain free and structurally integrated body. 

 

An example of an exercise that will get your pelvis to more neutral: 

 

if you are "anterior" you will most likely lift your ribs

and arch your back without knowing it!      

337Heather_Thamm0650   

 

A common correction...

363Heather_Thamm0666 

 

Nuetral!!!

357Heather_Thamm0661

 

 

 

BREATHING FOR A STRONGER BACK

SIMPLE SITTING AND STANDING EXERCISES

 

 

NIH STUDY OF PILATES AND FLEXIBILITY

 

Results
"The results showed that the Pilates training group improved flexibility significantly" and "No subjects from the control group passed the test at any stages"

Conclusions
Pilates can be used as an adjunctive exercise program to improve flexibility, enhance control-mobility of trunk and pelvic segments. It may also prevent and attenuate the predisposition to axial musculoskeletal injury. 

 

read the whole thing

 

THE SCIENCE OF LOSING INCHES with VASIE PILATES

 

In Boot Camp, it's typical to lose 3-6 inches around the lower, middle and upper abs.  The inches lost are usually NOT due to weight loss.  You get a smaller waist because you learn HOW to engage and tone the DEEPEST layer of abs and reset the resting tone of your core.

 

THE SCIENCE...

 

Your TRANSVERSUS ABDOMINUS is the ONLY layer of abs that can make your abs flatter and your waist narrower.

Unfortunately, there is no magic exercise or move you can do to train this. Unlike your bicep, your Transversus Abdominus doesn’t move any bones. But it does shrink your waist, support your back and help you breathe properly.

FOR GEEKS: http://dianelee.ca/article-training-deep-core-muscles.php

 

 

BREATHING IS THE ANSWER

 

So how do we train your Transversus during Boot Camp?

 

Kegels and Breathing! Sounds basic but this very specific training is research-based and proven to relieve back pain and flatten your abs! It is just one of the things that makes Studio One so unique: We take the time to teach you HOW to engage your core.

 

 

 

WHAT DOES IT MEAN IF I DON'T LOSE INCHES?

 

First, don’t take it personally. It usually means we need to give you different cues and hands-on corrections.  Research shows that your Transversus Abdominus will “shut off” when you have/had one or more of the following:

-      Childbirth

-      Abdominal surgery

-      Prolonged back pain

-      Back surgery

-      Whiplash

You may just need a little extra help in the beginning. That is what we are here to do! Talk to your instructor if you have any concerns. 

 

 

 

STRUCTURAL INTEGRATION CHANGES: 

ANA KOKAUROVA

September 2003 - 2011

381

 


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pilates@gci.net
 

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